Changing our story around death

Changing our story around death

I’ve been curious about death my whole life. I know that probably sounds morbid to many, but it’s true. Then again, I’m curious about almost everything. 

But death is a subject that really tends to kill a party (no pun intended). Our society is, as a general rule, afraid of dying. Maybe it’s our need to control or predict the future. Maybe it’s the unknown of what, if anything, comes next. Maybe it’s both. I don’t have the answers to when or what or why, but I do know that death is part of life. 

 

 

Engagement Matters

Engagement Matters

My life is and always has been about asking questions. Exploring what’s possible. Impossible didn't occur to me when I was young. I was lucky, because not only did that lead me to great adventures and experiences but also into beautiful and powerful relationships. Engaged relationships. Relationships that helped me stay involved, stay curious, and see things through. 

On Being Courageous

On Being Courageous

Here we are, another trip around the sun complete. As cliche as it can feel at times with resolutions and so on, the New Year marks a significant passage of time and an opportunity for us to take stock.

I’ve been thinking about what I want to invite in for 2017, what I want to create/manifest/experience. And the word that keeps coming up is Courage. This poem appeared in my inbox the other day;

 

The Talking Circle

The Talking Circle

I hardly know where to start. Yesterday the people of the United States of America had a chance to choose their next leader. Most of us had opinions, some of them very passionate, about who that should be. 

I am not American, and did not have a vote. I care because I know that a leader sets the tone and helps create the energy for the whole team, be it a school, an organization, or a country. To say I was surprised at the result would be a gross understatement. I was utterly gobsmacked and stuck in a perspective that all those people who voted for President-elect Donald Trump were simply wrong. 

 

 

Why acknowledging our pain makes us stronger

Why acknowledging our pain makes us stronger

Trauma is a word that evokes pictures, often unpleasant pictures, of accidents, wars, violence. Pictures we wish we could erase from our consciouness, and sometimes do. I’ve always mostly associated it with physical pain, visible to the eye. Pain we can see. As I continue to stretch into new awareness and understanding I’m expanding that perspective and seeing the full spectrum of what trauma is. What it means, and the not so visible impact that trauma can have.

On Being 47

On Being 47

It must be a dream, right? How could that possibly be my age? 

My heart beats faster just thinking about it. What does that mean? Why does my heart race at the idea that I’m nearing 50? That I’ve been on the planet for nearly 50 years?!? Okay, now it’s beating really fast.

What’s different today? I’m one day older than I was yesterday. The other thing that is different is that I believe I am actually wiser.  I’ve been really striving to be more conscious in life, to really savour my choices and be discerning about how I spend my time.  Sometimes that’s hard, because I want to be in lots of places with lots of people and yet I know the dangers of spreading myself too thin.

 

Inspiring Curiosity

 

This morning I woke up to find the above video in my newsfeed.  It is an excerpt from Dean James Ryan's commencement address titled "Good Questions." It made me want to leap out of bed and start asking. So here I am.

The Kickstarter to support the publishing of my new book "That's a Really Good Question" has one week left and is 76% funded, which is fantastic! Yesterday I asked the current backers to share why it was important to them that this book get into the world. These are some the responses:

"Since reading your book I have noticed where I am curious and when I choose not to be. When I am troubled and feeling shut down, closed about something - it’s usually when I am not being curious. Your book reminds me to seek what can be different and to look to see what happens when asking for more information, more humanity, more sharing. Experiencing the transformation that happen when we stay open to curiosity is why I believe in the Curiosity Revolution! This one came from Donna Forsyth who graciously agreed to pre-read it for me.

And this:

"I'm learning the art of good questions. Questions that lead into rich conversations. I'm excited to read Sue's book and learn more from one of my question-role-models about how to think, live and breathe curiosity. I'm curious what she has to say, and I'm curious what effect it will have on me. Curious enough to fund the printing of the book? Hell yeah." B.Clarke

All the info about the book and campaign is in this link. Kickstarter-That’s a Really Good Question

Start your curiosity revolution by supporting this project. 

What’s in it for you.

There are many ideas in this book, some you will connect with and some you may not. If you find one thing in this book that makes your life better then that’s enough for me because that one thing could lead to many other things. My only hope is that you get curious.

Please click the link to learn more and support the project by funding it and/or by sharing with your people.  I’m incredibly grateful for all of your ongoing support and love.  

With much love and gratitude,

Sue

First published on Huff Post Blog June 7, 2016

Lessons from a year of letting go...

Lessons from a year of letting go...

May 15th marked an anniversary for me.  One year as a nomad.  A year ago I decided to move out of my house and see what it would be like to “float,” to not have a house of my own, and to go wherever the wind and my desires took me. Fortunately my work as a coach and facilitator is congruent with that lifestyle, and I tend to love the unexpected. So I sold or gave away much of my furniture and other things I had been holding onto for many years because I was curious to see what would happen, how I would feel, what would come up. This is what I’ve learned.